Wigleaf’s round-up of (very) short fiction

I’m delighted to learn that my flash piece Gravity was longlisted for Wigleaf’s yearly round-up of the best very short fiction available online. It was published last year in NANO Fiction, a great little mag specialised in that kind of petite stories.

The top list is 50-story strong, so that’s quite a lot of reading for these long summer nights we have ahead, and when you’re done the longlist will keep you going.

 

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Quote #17 – Albert Londres, reporter

I’ve recently discovered Albert Londres (1884-1932), a globe-trotting French journalist who seems a bit like a real-world, earlier, more principled Tintin:

Misery is like any other State. Only those who live in it know it. Others don’t even think about it. And when sometimes they do talk about it, they do so as of a country they’ve never seen, that is to say that they only talk a lot of nonsense. 

This is from Les Chemins de Buenos Aires (the extract’s translation is mine), a book-length report on the apparently flourishing sex trafficking at the time (1927) between France and Argentina. In this often quite funny first-person account, Londres follows French pimps from Paris to Buenos Aires, tells of how they seduce or trick women into following them, how they cross the ocean and avoid the authorities, how they set them up in Argentina. It’s quite extraordinary to be transported to such a time and place (and milieu), to hear early 20th century pimps in their own words.

Other works of his that I plan on reading include Au bagne (on the French penal colony in Guyana), Chez les fous (an investigation of mistreatments in psychiatric institutions) as well as works on different subjects set in colonial Africa.

His books are translated in English, but I’m not sure how easily one could get his hands on one. But I’d recommend trying! Or if by any chance you read French, a good few of his works are available for free (Public Domain) on Wikisource.

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Quote #16 – Walter M. Miller

There were several dead refugees, one dead horse, and the dying cavalry officer who was pinned under the horse. At intervals the cavalryman awoke and faintly screamed. Now he screamed for Mother, and again he screamed for a priest. At times he awoke to scream for his horse. His screaming disquieted the buzzards and farther disgruntled the Poet, who was feeling peevish anyhow. He was a very dispirited Poet. He had never expected the world to act in a courteous, seemly, or even sensible manner, and the world had seldom done so; often he had taken heart in the consistency of its rudeness and stupidity. But never before had the world shot the poet in the abdomen with a musket. This he found not heartening at all.

from  A Canticle for Leibowitz,  by Walter M. Miller

 

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Quote #14 Hallucinated Ballard

 

Excited by my own sex, I felt light-headed and generous. All sense of hunger had left me. I decided to startle the placid town with my sex, but not by copulating with these suburbanites still asleep in their bedrooms. I would mount the town itself, transform Shepperton into an instant paradise more exotic than all the television travelogues that presided over their lives.

 

-from The Unlimited Dream Company, by JG Ballard

 

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(You can find an interview with Ballard in The Paris Review, where he says, among other things that the title of this novel was a mistake, as it sounded “like a jeans emporium”.

Unthology 8 launched

The latest instalment of the brilliant Unthology series was launched yesterday. As usual, it’s a great collection of fiction, gathering pieces that really work together, without falling into the old boring trap of theme or style unity. It’s as good as it looks, and it contains my short story “Nora and Anthony”.

It’s a theatrical romantic extravaganza, and if you happen to be a Corkonian, the set was fashioned after the Everyman Theatre.

Quote #13: Philip K. Dick’s kipple

“Kipple is useless objects, like junk mail or match folders after you use the last match or gum wrappers or yesterday’s homeopape. When nobody’s around, kipple reproduces itself. For instance, if you go to bed leaving any kipple around your apartment, when you wake up the next morning there’s twice as much of it. It always gets more and more.”

“I see.” The girl regarded him uncertainly, not knowing whether to believe him. Not sure if he meant it seriously.

“There’s the First law of Kipple,” he said. “‘Kipple drives out nonkipple.’ Like gresham’s law about bad money. And in these apartments there’s been nobody there to fight the kipple.”

“So it has taken over completely,” the girl finished. She nodded. “Now I understand.”

“Your place here,” he said, “this apartment you’ve picked – it’s too kipple-ized to live in. We can roll the kipple-factor back; we can do like I said, raid the other apts. But-” He broke off.

“But what?”

Isidore said, “We can’t win.”

 

Do androids dream of electric sheep, Philip K. Dick

 

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Fantastic Medley: a SF news round-up of sorts

Here are a few submission and reading opportunities you might be interested in, if you like your fiction weird:

Apex Magazine is open until November 16th for their Annual Flash Fiction Contest: it’s free to enter, and they’re looking for speculative stories under 250 words with a “Christmas Invasion” theme. Make sure you check out the great stuff they publish monthly, and while you’re at it, give them a buck – they’re running a subscription drive at the moment – or get a book from their publishing arm.

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Holdfast has just won the British Fantasy Society Best Magazine 2015 Award, and their 7th issue, “Looking forward, looking back”, is out now. I haven’t had time to dive into it yet, but it’s the usual mix of fiction, poetry, non-fiction (including the great “Unbelievers” section…), interview, book shelf… even a playlist! Anyway. Get thy virtual ass there and start reading.

They’re also open to submissions until January 15th for their next issue on the theme “Love, Sex, Romance“, and also on other themes for their annual print anthology.

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Great bargains to be had from Asimov’s and Analog at the moment: you can get 8 back issues for $6.95 (or 12 for $15.95) with – very important if you happen not to live in the US – very reasonable postage. I just received my package, and I’m looking forward to all that pulpy goodness… They’re also both open to submissions – find the guidelines on their respective websites.

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Full disclosure / self-promotion: I had pieces in Holdfast and Apex before, which you can read here and here.