“Late nights, he comes” in Liminal Stories

 

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I’m a bit late posting this here, but hey, well, ahum. No excuse, really. It’s something I’m really proud of, though, a story that kind of doesn’t follow a traditional timeline, you know, with stuff like time going forward and events happening one after the other and all that stuff.

It’s also a story that features landscape in a big way, and I took great pleasure in casting the Monts d’Arrée, the Brittany mountains I often crossed as a child, and a significant place in Breton mythology.

Another aspect I tried to transcribe in English was the roughness, or round-aboutness, of the French my grand-parents use.

I was very happy with the illustration (by Tracy Durnell),  which brilliantly captures the duality of the story, and its darkness (extra kudos for the research into traditional dress, and the black and white that echos the Gwenn-ha-du, the B&W Breton flag…). This is Liminal Stories’ second issue, and in their short life they have managed to position themselves as a very serious and high-profile speculative fiction magazine. I can only encourage you to read everything they put out!

So have an old read, folks, and let me know what you think.

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An anthology of strange Californian tales

I’m delighted to have a story coming up in this beautiful anthology edited by Jaym Gates and J. Daniel Batt:

Readers of speculative fiction might see a few bell-ringing names in that table of content (folks like Nick Mamatas, Seanan McGuire, Tim Pratt or E. Catherine Tobler…), and I really can’t wait to read the 25 other stories included in the book. I mean, listen to this:

“Strange California is 26 tales of strangeness, lavishly illustrated, that will pull you into another world, a world where migrant girls stand up to witches who live in orange groves, where trickster magpies try to steal souls from Russian sisters in the early days of Fort Bragg, where water is both currency and predator, and Gold Rush-era ghosts wander the streets of San Francisco alongside panther ladies.”

I’m responsible for the Gold Rush-era ghosts, by the way. Which was a lot of fun. So if this all sounds like something you’d enjoy, go have a look at the Kickstarter page, there are a whole lot of goodies you can get along with the anthology in physical or electronic form.  For a measly 200 bucks, you can even get one of the characters from my story named after you!

 

 

 

Lonely red world serenade

 

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I have a short story, “Lonely Red World Serenade”, up in the inaugural issue of Helios Quarterly. You can and should get it here, to get your fill of speculative fiction and poetry on the theme of miscommunication.

My own contribution is a story of robotic unrequited love set, as you might have guessed, on Mars.

If you write that kind of stuff, Helios will be open to submissions for the first two weeks of October for another themed issue, details of which you can find here.

Over.

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TFW Fame Comes Knocking At Your Local Lowtown Branch – Unsung Stories

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I’m fierce delighted to have a new story up at the great Unsung Stories. It’s about what happens when a lowly burger-flipper gets to meet his idol. It’s a bit wild, and half told through social media, so you’ll be right at home, you screen monkey. It goes like this:

“I’m getting to 9.2 on the boredom scale (not that I’m casting it, of course, but then I wouldn’t bet an arm that the feed isn’t tapping my meat for emotional data), placing trays on the counter and loading them with wax-paper parcels of food as fast as I can, when I glimpse Stuart Mafokate’s perfect face on the screenwall that lines the entrance…”

You can keep reading it here. Go on it’s only short. And if you don’t know Unsung Stories, you should definitely have a look around their website. In addition to publishing SF/weird short stories every fortnight, they publish great books in the same genres.

 

 

 

Your Summer submissions (no, we are not talking BDSM here)

Why go out in the sun, frolic in fields or on beaches when you could be sitting at you kitchen table, blinds drawn, in your favourite kickers, emailing strangers strange stories you made up, right?

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Me and my personal manuscript sender.

 

Here’s who to pester this Summer:

  • The Stinging Fly : one of Ireland’s best magazines opens for online submission for the first time this August. Well worth buying an issue or subscribing if you don’t know them. They’re the folks behind short stories all-stars such as Kevin Barry, Danielle McLaughlin, Claire-Louise Bennett…
  • Gamut : So new they don’t have a website yet. They’ll launch in August, and open to submissions then. Editor is Richard Thomas, who is also Editor-in-chief of Dark House Press, and what he wants is “neo-noir, speculative fiction”. So ready your weird-ass shit, folks. Will pay handsomely.
  • Geometry : a brand-new online lit mag with a nice, clear look is looking for submissions for their inaugural issue. They’re based in New Zealand, but have an international outlook, and they pay! Deadline is September 1st.
  • Slice : this ever beautiful American magazine is open until August 1st to submissions on the theme “Corporeal”. Pays $250 for stories and $75 for poems.
  • DEAD INK BOOKS : also with a deadline on August 1st, this relatively new publisher is looking for stories between 5,000 and 30,000 words on the them of “Exile”, to be published as e-books as part of a series.

 

So, that should keep you busy, and away from beaches and sun-lit streets, these locales of loose morals and looser garments. As usual, do your homework, buy magazines, don’t be a dick, etc.